A Cometary Catastrophe

Earth Sciences

Date: Feb, 2018

Source: The Journal of Geology

Less well known is the discovery that fragments of a disintegrating ~100km-diameter comet collided with the Earth some 12,800 years ago in what is known as the Younger Dryas period (named after a signature Arctic flower). The collision triggered a rapid return to glacial conditions which lasted about 1,400 years, interrupting the gradual warming of the planet after the Last Glacial Maximum around 20,000 years ago. In a recent two-part publication, Wolbach (and 31 co-authors) presented a detailed analysis of evidence of this most unusual climatic episode gathered over the last decade (Wolbach et al. 2018, Jour. Geology, v 126: 165-184; 185-205). Data was gathered from ice-cores in Greenland, Russia and Antarctica as well as from lake, marine and terrestrial sediments. Contemporaneous layers of charcoal and dust in these geographically dispersed cores confirm this cosmic impact event. These specific layers are enriched in platinum and other impact-related elements. They also contain glassy spherules and nano-diamonds, and are anomalously high in ammonia, nitrate, and other compounds that represent a major period of extensive biomass burning. Sea levels rose a few meters due to major melting of the North American Ice Cap and this surge of fresh water disturbed the oceanic circulation that began a period of cooling.

 

Evidence points to numerous fragments of a disintegrating comet detonating above and/or colliding with ice-sheets, oceans, and land on at least four continents centered on North America. The radiant and thermal energy from multiple explosions triggered extensive multiple wildfires that are estimated to have burned about 10% of the planet’s biomass, considerably more than that accompanying the meteorite impact that caused the demise of the dinosaurs. The burning created long-lived atmospheric soot, blocking most sunlight and creating an impact winter and acid rain. The reduced vegetation caused a major crisis in the ecosystem that may have contributed to many megafaunal extinctions including mammoths, mastodons, ground sloths and American horses, along with many birds and smaller mammals. Human population declined for about a thousand years and the demise of the Clovis hunters ensued. This synchronicity of multiple events makes the Younger Dryas interval one of the most unusual climatic/ecological episodes during the last two million years. It also raises the importance of supporting the Near Earth Asteroid Survey in defense of future serious impacts on our planet.”

Role of magnetic fields in star formation

Space Sciences

Date: October, 2016

Source: Nature 538,8

Because the theoretical predictions for star formation in science do not match what is actually observed, scientist have lately begun to consider the possibility that electromagnetism plays a roll in the process.

The Scientific Journal Nature (538,8),  published an article : ” Astronomy: Magnetism drives star birth”. In this article, Nature refers to an article from Astronomy & Astrophysics (593,L14, 2016), where a team of scientists made observations of a large gas cloud with the Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) telescope in northern Chile. They observed that the gas of a stellar system collapsed and fragmented, . . . forming a string of clumps. The clumps will eventually form the cores of future stars. From these observations, they ran numerical simulations to match the observations, and they discovered that these formations can be modeled, using strong magnetic fields.  The study findings confirm theoretical predictions that magnetic fields play a major part in  protostars formation.

Blavatsky proposes that electromagnetism (the primary manifestation of Fohat on the physical plane) is the main force responsible for cosmic processes. In the Secret Doctrine, she quotes an “ancient Commentary to Stanza IV,” which describes the formation of a cosmic systems in a way that matches what science observes today:

The grains (of spawn) are soon attracted to each other and form the curds in the Ocean (of Space). The larger lumps coalesce and receive new spawn . . . and at the appointed time some of the lumps detach themselves and assume spheroidal form . . . after which . . . motion (the Breath) becomes the whirlwind and sets them into rotation.” (SD vol. 1, p. 97)

see : Nature article

see : Astronomy and Astrophysics article

 

Why Big Bang May Not Be the Beginning

Space Sciences
Date: March, 2018
Source: New Scientist

A theory in modern cosmology is suggesting that the Big Bang may not be the beginning of the universe. The Big Bounce Theory propounded by a number of physicists state that prior to the Big Bang the universe underwent contraction due to pressure until it reached a point that it expanded again. They say that the universe may have been undergoing continuous contraction and expansion. Paul J. Steinhardt of Princeton University, one of the proponents of the Cyclic Theory, says that this theory attempts to resolve the “homogeneity, isotropy, and flatness of the universe,” among other things observed.

This view is similar to the Hindu view about the periodic manifestation and dissolution (manvantara and pralaya) of the universe, a view also adopted by the Secret Doctrine of H. P. Blavatsky.

Sources: New Scientist, March 14, 2018; https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg23731690-700-why-the-big-bang-was-not-the-beginning/

Why Big Bang was not the beginning

Cosmology – Models of Cyclic Universe

Space Sciences
Astrophysics
Date: January, 2018
Source: Quanta Magazine

More and more scientific models of the universe are challenging the Big Bang theory in favor of a Big Bounce Model.
Superstrings / Membranes & M-Theory are the focus of current Cosmology studies.
Stephen Phillips – The Mathematical Connection Between religion and Science, 2009,  gives an accurate update of the current science streams in physics, including Supersymmetry, Supergravity and Superstrings Models.
Sources: